Increased risk of infective endocarditis after traumatic skin wound.

Current data suggest that a history of traumatic open skin wounds may be a risk factor for infectious endocarditis, with limited evidence. We tested the hypothesis that traumatic skin wound is a risk factor for infectious endocarditis.Using the Japan Medical Data Center (JMDC) database (4 650 927 people aged 20-64 years, 2012-2018) and the Kumamoto database (493 414 people aged ≥65 years, 2012-2017), we conducted nested case-control and self-controlled case series (SCCS) analyses.In the JMDC database, 544 cases hospitalised for infective endocarditis (IE) were matched with 2091 controls; 2.8% of cases and 0.5% of controls were exposed to traumatic skin wounds in the previous 1-4 weeks, with an adjusted OR of 4.31 (95% CI 1.74 to 10.7). In the Kumamoto database, 4.0% (27/670) of cases and 1.1% (29/2581) of controls were exposed to traumatic skin wounds in the previous 1-4 weeks, with an adjusted OR of 4.15 (95% CI 2.04 to 8.46). In the SCCS, the incidence rate ratios for IE were 2.61 (95% CI 1.67 to 4.09), 1.73 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.94), 1.19 (95% CI 0.63 to 2.27) and 1.52 (95% CI 0.82 to 2.74) for the Kumamoto database and 3.78 (95% CI 2.07 to 6.92), 1.58 (95% CI 0.64 to 3.89), 1.60 (95% CI 0.65 to 3.94) and 1.29 (95% CI 0.47 to 3.53) for the JMDC database at 1-4, 5-8, 9-12 and 13-16 weeks after traumatic skin wound, respectively, compared with the baseline period.This study suggests that traumatic skin wound is a risk factor for IE 1-4 weeks after the wound.


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Authors: Hiroyuki Ohbe, Masao Iwagami, Yusuke Sasabuchi, Hideo Yasunaga