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Also in the press

OnMedica staff

Friday, 13 April 2012

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"REVOLUTIONARY" DENTIST TEST COULD SPOT ORAL CANCER IN 20 MINUTES

The Daily Mail (p19) says a "revolutionary" test could allow dentists to diagnose oral cancer in less than 20 minutes.

Currently biopsy testing means mouth tissue has to be taken using a scalpel, but the new technique involves collecting cells from a patient's mouth using a brush and then generating a reading from a desktop computer.

Researchers from the University of Sheffield in the UK and Rice University in the U.S. are leading a two-year trial, which could result in the technique becoming standard practice. It is also hoped the test could be adapted for detecting heart attacks.

GENE THERAPY PROVIDES HOPE FOR PARKINSON'S

The Daily Telegraph (p2) says that a woman taking part in an early-stage gene-therapy trial for Parkinson's disease is now able to write for the first time in 15 years after receiving the therapy.

ProSavin, developed by Oxford BioMedica, involves injecting a modified virus carrying the genes directly into the motor centre of the brain. The genes provide the coded instructions for proteins needed to make dopamine, a brain chemical essential for control of movement.

The trial is being conducted in Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge and the Henri Mondor Hospital in Paris.

"Dr Philip Buttery, of the Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair, who is leading the British team, said that although the research was still at an early stage, it appeared to be having positive results," reports the Telegraph.

CONTINUOUS RISE OF LUNG CANCER RATES IN UK WOMEN

The Daily Telegraph (p9) reports that according to figures from charity Cancer Research UK, lung cancer rates are continuing to rise in British women, with more than 18,000 cases diagnosed in 2009.

"There were 39 cases of lung cancer for every 100,000 women in 2009, compared with 22 per 100,000 in 1975. Cases of the disease have peaked and are now falling among men," says the paper.

The Telegraph says lung cancer can take up to 30 years to develop to a stage where symptoms can be spotted and the new figures match smoking rates.

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