l

The content of this website is intended for healthcare professionals only

Rise in hospital admissions attributable to smoking

Admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking rise by 5% in ten years

Ingrid Torjesen

Friday, 27 May 2016

The number of hospital admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking has risen by 5% in the last ten years, figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre show.

In 2014-15, 475,000 were considered to be due to smoking – 23,000 more than a decade previously.

However, at the same time, the number of deaths among adults aged 35 and over which were estimated to be attributable to smoking has declined, the figures published in Statistics on Smoking, England 2016 show. There were 78,000 deaths in 2014 compared to 89,000 in 2004. In 2014, 47,000 deaths in men were believed to be due to smoking (21% of all deaths) and 31,000 of those in women (13%).

Furthermore, admissions to hospital for adults aged 35 and over for primary conditions which can be caused by smoking, but where smoking may or may not have actually been the cause, rose by 22% between 2004-5 and 2014-15. There were 1.7 million admissions to hospital for these conditions in 2014-15 - an average of 4,700 admissions per day – a rise of 311,000 since 2004-05.

The report also includes regional data on hospital admissions and mortality rates estimated to be attributable to smoking for local authority areas. In 2014-15, Blackpool had the highest estimated hospital admission rate for smoking-related conditions, with 2,830 per 100,000 of population and City of London had the lowest rate with 880. Manchester had the highest estimated rate of smoking-related mortality with 458 per 100,000 of population and Harrow had the lowest rate with 185.

The report also shows that cancer was the condition resulting in the highest number of admissions estimated to be attributable to smoking in 2014-15 with 159,000 and 69% of these were male patients.

Responsible statistician, Paul Niblett, said: “Statistics on Smoking collates information from a wide range of sources so we can present a complete picture of smoking prevalence and its effect on health. By looking at survey, hospital and deaths data, it is possible to see how behaviours, attitudes and the consequences of smoking have changed over the past ten years.

“The data are also analysed further to look at specific demographic groups and behaviours, such as young people, Local Authority areas and usage of e-cigarettes to inform public health initiatives.”

Registered in England and Wales. Reg No. 2530185. c/o Wilmington plc, 5th Floor, 10 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 8QS. Reg No. 30158470